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MORRIS PRATT.

Here was a new burden coming upon Moses. He must resign his charge at Buffalo, and go to Whitewater, Wisconsin, not only to take the oversight of a school, but to teach, an undertaking for which he felt himself wholly unprepared. But these were the only terms on which Mr. Pratt would give the property at the time. Certainly, it had been much easier for Moses to remain where he had an assured salary, where he would have so much less work, than to take charge of a school which he knew must require a long siege of hard work and self-denial before he could get it firmly established. But Moses never shrank from duty. He yielded up his easy and comfortable position, and went to Whitewater to enter upon years of labor and unrequited toil. He took up his work and now looked about for his teachers. There was one that he could obtain, as capable a man as could be found, a self-sacrificing man, who never shrank from a duty, and who would freely give his services-Professor A. J. Weaver. Then the other teachers: there was himself, Mattie and his daughter, Alfaretta (Mrs. Niver).* And here the critic got busy. It was called "a Hull institution." "It was an excellent enterprise; it furnished occupation and place for the Hull family." His critics never stopped to ask themselves how it could be anything else under the circumstances. Not one of his critics ever offered to relieve the institution of one of the family. It was a "Hull institution" because when he could obtain no others, he must take the Hulls. Then some of the writers bitterly attacked him in the Spiritualist papers. 0, how bitter and cutting was their language! How they poured contumely upon him! And, how patiently he bore it all, seldom going out of his way to reply to them. But now there is one Hull less in the institution, and we know that those who criticized him then, have since seen their mistake, and will join hands with poor Mattie, to assist her in placing the institution on a self-supporting basis.

Then there were lawsuits; for Morris Pratt had passed away before perfecting all his plans. The building required to be fitted up for school, at considerable expense in which the public was invited to assist, and a contribution was also asked from the National Association. This elicited more sharp criticism from those who doubted the wisdom of the school. Money was borrowed, Moses sometimes giving his personal note at the banks for it. These obligations worried him! The lawsuits worried him! The criticisms worried him! For the burden was mostly on his shoulders, and it seemed at times, that lie must faint beneath his ponderous load. But though he staggered under his oppressive burden, he never, for a moment flinched from what seemed to him his duty. He went forward, sword in hand to fight his way, while bearing these heavy burdens.

And now a word concerning his critics: They were not enemies-they were friends. Had any outsider attacked him, how swiftly they would have rushed to his defense. But criticism from our friends is infinitely more severe upon us than criticism from our enemies. The wound seems to penetrate deeper into our natures. Did you ever realize how sharp the kindest people are in controversy? Had they known how deeply their words had stung their loved friends, they would have grieved over. them as if they had been uttered by another than themselves. But it was fate (his karma, Theosophists would tell you) thus to be stung. It assisted him in developing those splendid and kind qualities of his nature.

But Moses won every battle, in spite of every adversity he came out successful. Others would have yielded to the difficulties he met, but not he. It soon became apparent that he could not remain with his class and keep the school going, so he took the field again, earning means to aid the school, at times writing lessons and sending them to be read to the class by some one else. The three last trips to the Pacific coast were made for the purpose of raising money for this school. and within four days of his passing away, he was raising his voice for the purpose. While staggering under the load, he dropped out of this life and rose to the other freed from it, but not freed from the concern; he had for his associate workers, Professor Weaver, Mattie and his daughter Alfaretta. Such altruism is a rare quality, possessed by only a few persons. All proceeds from their labors except what was actually needed for traveling expenses were sent to the school.

*During the first school year Florence (Mrs. Johnson), Mr. Hull's eldest daughter, taught as a substitute for Mrs. Niver.

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